Unusual Ingredient of the Week-Goat Saliva (YES, GOAT SALIVA!)

Judging from the rumblings in cyberspace over the past several months, goat meat is about to become the next big thing. I have eaten some wonderful goat dishes prepared by my Haitian friends in Central Florida. Freya, however, hasn’t had the opportunity to try this Caribbean favourite, but she was determined to make some after seeing Hugh F-W prepare curried goat on his show. Curried goat is delicious, so naturally I was excited when Freya decided to purchase some goat meat so she could weigh in on the issue.
I may have mentioned this in the past, but we live in a cultural wasteland. I can only imagine the look on my local butchers face if I were to go in and ask for a kilogram of goat, thank you very much! It would probably be akin to the time I walked into a Lakewood, Colorado liquor store and asked for a case of Guinness that hadn’t been chilled (I love very warm stout you see). The guy at the counter, obviously well versed in customer relations, said, “This is America, son. We drink our beer cold.” So the logical place to turn was, as usual, the internet.
A Google search for goat turns up a plethora of results, some very unexpected. Included among these was a health supplement website selling goat saliva. At first I thought they were kidding, but apparently not. The website makes claims about the curative properties of goat saliva which seem a bit farfetched. Among others, they claim that aloe vera and goat saliva have been considered equally useful at treating cuts and burns by tribal cultures for centuries. I had to wonder why, if this was so, had I never heard of this remedy.
The website also offers several links to scientific papers on the benefits of goat saliva. Following these links made me even more sceptical though as they all seem to relate to the relationship between plants and herbivores. If there was any proof to be found in these links as to the validity of their claims, I wasn’t going to find out as a payment was required by all of them to review the text in full. Some of the links were so incomplete that the entire study title wasn’t viewable without a cash transaction. If you’re a bit more financially well endowed than I, please feel free to read the articles and let me know what you find out.
Fortunately, another search of Google, this time with the key words Goat Saliva, was much more beneficial. Apparently I’ve been living under a rock because this is for real. Unfortunately, it’s not necessarily based on any legitimate science. If one decides to draw an inference from an article I found on Portland Food and Drink.com, the proponents of this sort of dietary supplement also recommend eating sand!
The scarier aspects of ingesting goat saliva are revealed by articles about rabies in goats. I imagine that rabid goats are a rarity, but as the supplement industry is free from FDA standards, how would you know that what you're getting isn’t going to lead to a long stay in the hospital.
If you are willing to leave your doubts and concerns at the door though, the makers are happy to expound on the virtues of their product, amusingly called Goatslick.
It’s available in two forms. The first is a salve of concentrated goat saliva extracted from goats fed on a diet rich in nettles, a natural anti-inflammatory. The second version is goat saliva au naturale to be used as a “flavorful addition for use in cooking and baking”.
The makers are so convinced of their claims that they even give away free samples. Of course, we had to take advantage of the offer of a gratis 6 oz. bottle (and 1 oz. sachet of the salve).
After two months, our samples finally arrived. The label on the bottle has a cute picture of a goat and boldly declares “Aloe Vera of the 21st Century”. In much smaller print it indicates that the bottle contains 98% goat saliva. Given the propensity of the common goat to eat just about anything and everything it sees, and given the amount of detritus that a good shake of the bottle reveals, that 2% is a very scary number. The label on the back reassures us that the 2% is a combination of a natural stabilising agent and plant matter consistent with the organic diet of free-range goats.
Freya and I don’t have the guts to try this yet. I think it will probably occupy a position on the shelf in the living room next to the King Oscars Fish Balls in a Can as part of our Food As Pop Art collection. If you are braver than we, or you have your own collection of food oddities, you can get your own FREE SAMPLES from the website.
Good Luck!

29 comments:

eliza said...

i'm not sure whether this drink is bizzare or innovative :D good luck trying it!

rachel said...

I don't know if that sounds nasty or if I'm intrigued. I usually like unusual ingredients, but I'm not that daring. Something about spit that just seems wrong.

MyKitchenInHalfCups said...

This would have to be the most unusual health supplement I have ever seen. You're suppose to drink the stuff?
Certainly I know that all animals lick their wounds and it does keep them clean and most times free of infection to heal. There are some pretty nasty sounding old home remedies but this is one I've missed.

MyKitchenInHalfCups said...

OK, I should have known.
Very good.

Deborah Dowd said...

Seriously, I have had and made goat, a delicious sweet meat not unlike lamb. I have gotten this meat from a local farm where all the animals are free range. However, I don't care how free or happy the goat is, I dont want to drink, cook with, or even see its saliva!

Kelly-Jane said...

Well I was thinking What? Ewww, that's so grim! You got me too, well done.

KJxx

Kathryn said...

Happy April 1st to you too!

I must admit you had me going too momentarily...

Paprika said...

Hahaha! Good one! Was completely fooled! Terrible...

Lydia said...

I'm sure this will be the best April Fool's post I'll read all day! Well done!

Lis said...

Although I commend your dedication to finding the truth about goat's saliva.. uhh Paul? I threw up in my mouth a little bit.

If you guys do decide to try it? Warn me before you post so I can skip that review, okay? hahahaha!

Lis said...

har! See what I get for not reading comments first? Well done! :D

mooncrazy said...

You two big ol goofs! Thanks for the laugh!

Nandita said...

As much as it sounds unusual, I would be petrified to try something like this out...Not even because I am vegetarian but also because I would wonder how many bacteria / organisms would the saliva contain, and if it were sterilised with some procedure, then wouldn't the curative properties be destroyed?
Thanks for bringing this unusual thing in front of us :) I was smiling thru the post!

Doodles said...

you two are goofs....that is so funny. Being a past owner of a GOAT I was a tad curious!!! Thanks for the big smiles. Brits with a sense of humor wonderful!

Katie said...

You have Fish Balls?
I had 2 cans of Chef-Boy-r-Dee 'Fish Assholes in Tomato Sauce'. Unfortunately (or not) they were lost in the last move...
I'll pass on the saliva.
Our local super market had goat for the first time last week. Please don't tell me we're getting trendy!

Joyce said...

and a Happy 4/1 to you both, too!

Don't laugh at eating sand, though it's actually eating clay or dirt (geophagy). I just read that the compulsion is a natural body response to deficiencies in the mineral content of our food.

Guess if you mix the goat stuff with the dirt you could blog about mud pies! Happy Sunday, guys!

pom d'api said...

Hi!
First, I'm so happy, very happy for this comment to my blog. My name it's Candy, I'm 24 years and I leave in Clermont Ferrand in France. Thank you for this coming. Nice to meet you. I love so much your country, I love USA. He's a very beautiful country. Thank's for the laughs and happy Sunday days for you and night for me.
See you later

Monkey Wrangler said...

This post really brought me back to my youth. My great-great grandmother used to make goatslick goober gum. If ever there was a tasty treat for keeping your mouth working long hours on something.....it was them.

Really, drizzled over a birria crepe......yeah that sounds good.

Happy, good times.
Har, har......

tigerfish said...

Yees, and yucks!
But the chinese dessert known as Bird's Nest is also bird's (swallow) saliva. And the dessert is good. Known to improve complexion due to collagen in bird saliva.:O

JennDZ said...

Wow that is crazy!
I am gonna have to get my free sample!

Thanks for stopping by my blog!

Sig said...

Hahaha... U had me going there for a second before I realized what the heck is going on.... You guys are too funny, that was a good one :)... the best I've seen today... Love that label, GoatSuck!!!!!!!!!!!

Pille said...

You're hilarious!!! :)

s'kat said...

Ha!That's what I get for reading before my first cuppa the day! Thanks for the laugh.

David said...

I like to try new things but will pass on this thanks!

Gattina said...

*LOL*
I rather use my own drools, thank you very much :D

Kristen said...

This is one free product I will pass on. Ewwww!

Freya and Paul said...

What a great result! Do you know that this hoax has been fermenting for well over six months? I designed the label back in September and anxiously waited for April to roll around. There have been bigger and better scams, the European Union for instance, but I think this was in the top ten best food blog April Fools pranks, if I do say so myself.

For everybody who fell for this, including my mom, brother, and sister-in-law, I hope you haven't tried harvesting your own supply from anywhere. And for everybody who realised it was a prank, I hope you had a good laugh.

Normal comment responses will resume in an estimated 20 days as we have reached end-game with our claim against the bank. I am finishing my final letter to S.C.And.M., the solicitors for the bank. 2600 words and counting!

Helene said...

You try first....

aria said...

what!? goatspit, now i've heard it all. i have to say though, i went to school in carribean and we had goat and rice pretty much every day for lunch. curry gouat is delicious too! yum....